Want the truth about weed and hay fever?

Arrrggh! Just when we thought it was all over for one year the pollen is back with a vengeance. In case you’re wondering what’s going on, weed pollen is in full force. Although the dry weather has killed the grass, nettles and mugwort are thriving and pollen levels have spiked again.

These common weeds don’t care how hot it gets and without having to compete with grass they are still flowering in verges and hedgerows. Together with more warm weather they’re creating pollen soup for the next few days and playing havoc with sensitive noses everywhere.

We always try to find an upside here at Breaze HQ and after a bit of help from google, it turns out nettles and mugwort could actually be quite helpful. Although further research is needed, some studies have shown links between the natural anti-inflammatory properties of stinging nettle leaf and reduced sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes in people with hay fever. If you want to give it a try, put the kettle and your gardening gloves on. Pick a handful of the top leaves, pop them your teapot add boiling water to neutralise the stings and let it stew for 10-15 minutes. You can drink the nettle tea hot or cold. Let us know if you think it helps!

Mugwort is actually a wild herb that’s been used for centuries in various therapeutic treatments. Very high in magnesium and calcium, the leaves can be added to salads and tea made from infusing the dried flowers is thought to help with digestion. Do a bit of research first though!  It’s closely related to Artemisia or Wormwood – the plant used to make the infamous hallucinogenic spirit Absinthe!

Mugwort